Keith Nuthall


Keith writes about regulatory and other issues facing the European auto industry.

U.K. Auto Industry May Pay High Price for Brexit
With the new government acknowledging opposition to unrestricted immigration into the U.K. from the EU was a key to Brexit’s approval, the U.K. may have to limit immigration if a new trade deal with the EU is to avoid duties on U.K. exports.
Brexit Complicates U.S.-EU Trade-Deal Negotiations
Thursday’s referendum vote has created deep uncertainty about market access, particularly exports, for automakers operating in the U.K. The same would apply to EU legislation affecting car companies, such as emissions and safety standards.
Vietnam On Board With EU Vehicle Rules in Trade Deal
“The agreement will unlock a market with huge potential for EU firms,” Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom says. “Vietnam is a fast-growing economy of more than 90 million consumers with a growing middle class and a young and dynamic workforce.”
U.S.-EU Trade Talks Focus on Vehicle Harmonization
In the latest talks, regulators discussed mutual recognition of EU and U.S. automotive standards, notably on braking systems, and harmonization of rules, such as for seatbelt anchorages. Tariff-reduction proposals are being exchanged as well.
Trans-Pacific Pact Clears Way for Auto-Sector Growth
The agreement includes tariff-elimination schedules and rules of origin for the automotive sector. It also details what proportion of an automobile or a part must be made in a partnership member country for duty reductions to apply.
Industry Gives Trans-Pacific Trade Pact Mixed Reviews 1
While American automakers may cheer the agreement’s provisions for gradual lifting of Japanese tariffs on U.S. autos, they are quick to point out these free-trade benefits risk being outweighed by currency manipulation.
European Parliament, Auto-Industry Groups Tout TTIP
A study by the Petersen Institute of International Economics contends harmonizing U.S.-EU safety and environmental regulations would boost the automotive trade at least 20%.
Ukraine Promises to Lift Auto Safeguard Duties 
The Ukraine government grumbles the WTO panel had found fault with alleged failings by Kiev over how it had justified levying the duties, which are supposed to give local industries time to react to an import boom and become competitive.
Ukraine Duties on Car Imports Under Fire From WTO
Japan’s complaint to the WTO claims Ukraine’s duties violate the trade organization’s agreement on safeguards and its general agreement on tariffs and trade (GATT).
German Makes Top EU List of Possibly Dangerous Cars
The consumer watchdog received only two complaints about vehicles from China in 2014, which is noteworthy, given Chinese-made products’ reputation for consumer safety is not high.
EU Raising Stake in Fuel-Cell, Hydrogen Technology 
The public-private partnership’s calls for proposals include projects ranging from mobile fuel-cell technology development to the rollout of refueling infrastructure.
Canada’s Auto Industry Wary of South Korea Trade Deal 
A Canadian union official says trade between the two countries currently is a ‟one-way” street favoring South Korea, and the pending trade agreement threatens to make a bad situation worse.
WTO Trade Deal Could Spur Globalization, Expert Says 
The agreement could encourage automakers to build assembly plants in developing countries such as Pakistan and Indonesia by removing complex import rules that impede the purchase of parts.
EU Members Strike Proposed Deal on 2020 CO2 Emissions Targets 
Critically, the agreement provides for the continued use of super-credits within the emissions measurement formula for green vehicles such as EVs and hybrids. These can bring down the average CO2 emissions level assessed for auto makers.
EU Sets New Limits on Government Green-Vehicle Aid
The Commision since 2008 has given EU countries more leeway to offer tax breaks, low-interest loans and grants for making and buying energy-efficient vehicles, but is concerned that member states are using these rights in conflicting ways.


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