Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder signs legislation that puts regulations on self-driving vehicles on the books and moves the state to the forefront of automated-vehicle development.

With the signing, Michigan joins seven other states that have passed autonomous-vehicle legislation.

Michigan’s law allows public-road testing of vehicles without steering wheels and pedals and not requiring human control.

It also clears the way for automotive and technology companies to operate ride-sharing services using self-driving vehicles and for automated vehicles to be sold to the public “once the technology has been tested and certified.”

The new law also establishes the Michigan Council on Future Mobility. Overseen by the Michigan Department of Transportation, it will recommend policies to set industry standards and regulate connected-vehicle networks and how traffic data is collected and shared.

FCA U.S., Ford , General Motors, Toyota, Google, Uber and Lyft all provided input during the formation of the law, which comes as part of the state’s efforts to become a leader in autonomous-vehicle technology development.

The ceremonial signing, held today at the Automotive Hall of Fame in Dearborn, MI, comes on the heels of a groundbreaking for the American Center for Mobility’s state-funded autonomous-vehicle test track and research operation in Ypsilanti, MI. The first of its three test tracks, a highway circuit, is expected to be in operation by December 2017.

dzoia@wardsauto.com @DavidZoia